Our friends at the de Young Museum officially open the doors to Picasso: Masterpieces from the Musée National Picasso, Paris today! We saw the show at a special press preview yesterday and we have to say that the de Young and Musée Picasso have really put together a wonderful show on Mr. Pablo Picasso. Pick up tickets now!

Buy tickets here:  http://deyoung.famsf.org/pressroom/pressreleases/picasso-masterpieces-mus-e-national-picasso-paris-opens-de-young-museum-san-

Pablo Picasso
Deux femmes courant sur la plage (La Course)
Two Women Running on the Beach (The Race)
Goache on plywood. 1922

Lola de Valence was one of a group of gouaches shown in Magritte’s first one-man show in Paris in 1948. Disgruntled that it took the Parisian art world so long to appreciate his art, Magritte called these gouaches the “vache,” or “cow” paintings, after their deliberately provocative style and content. The title of this work refers to a scandalous portrait of a Spanish dancer painted by the French artist Edouard Manet in 1862, and then immortalized in a poem by Charles Baudelaire. Magritte takes images from his own work of the 1930s, the naked woman leaning against a rock and a female torso, and arranges them in a cold and artificial way. Rather than being a painting about a woman, Lola de Valence is a parody on Magritte’s own reputation as a painter of enigmatic nudes and the artificiality of the Surrealist encounter with the female body.

Lola de Valence was one of a group of gouaches shown in Magritte’s first one-man show in Paris in 1948. Disgruntled that it took the Parisian art world so long to appreciate his art, Magritte called these gouaches the “vache,” or “cow” paintings, after their deliberately provocative style and content. The title of this work refers to a scandalous portrait of a Spanish dancer painted by the French artist Edouard Manet in 1862, and then immortalized in a poem by Charles Baudelaire. Magritte takes images from his own work of the 1930s, the naked woman leaning against a rock and a female torso, and arranges them in a cold and artificial way. Rather than being a painting about a woman, Lola de Valence is a parody on Magritte’s own reputation as a painter of enigmatic nudes and the artificiality of the Surrealist encounter with the female body.

The second most expensive painting ever sold…
Woman III is a painting by abstract expressionist painter Willem de Kooning. Woman III is one of a series of six paintings by de Kooning done between 1951 and 1953 in which the central theme was a woman. It measures 68 by 48½ inches (1.7 m × 1.2 m) and was completed in 1953.
From late 70s to 1994 this painting was part of Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art collection, but after the revolution in 1979, this painting could not be shown because of strict rules set by the government about the visual arts and what they depict. Finally, in 1994 it was quietly traded by Thomas Ammann Fine Art to David Geffen for the remainder of the 16th century Persian manuscript, Tahmasbi Shahnameh.
In November 2006, the painting was sold by David Geffen to billionaire Steven A. Cohen for $137.5 million, making it the second most expensive painting ever sold.

The second most expensive painting ever sold…

Woman III is a painting by abstract expressionist painter Willem de Kooning. Woman III is one of a series of six paintings by de Kooning done between 1951 and 1953 in which the central theme was a woman. It measures 68 by 48½ inches (1.7 m × 1.2 m) and was completed in 1953.

From late 70s to 1994 this painting was part of Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art collection, but after the revolution in 1979, this painting could not be shown because of strict rules set by the government about the visual arts and what they depict. Finally, in 1994 it was quietly traded by Thomas Ammann Fine Art to David Geffen for the remainder of the 16th century Persian manuscript, Tahmasbi Shahnameh.

In November 2006, the painting was sold by David Geffen to billionaire Steven A. Cohen for $137.5 million, making it the second most expensive painting ever sold.

The Starry Night (Dutch: De sterrennacht) is a painting by Dutch post-impressionist artist Vincent van Gogh. The painting depicts the view outside his sanitarium room window at night, although it was painted from memory during the day. Since 1941 it has been in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. Reproduced often, the painting is widely hailed as his magnum opus.

In September 1888, while van Gogh was staying in Arles, he executed a painting commonly known as Starry Night Over the Rhone and later he incorporated a pen drawing in a set of a dozen based on recent paintings. Van Gogh claimed to have a “terrible need for religion” when he painted Starry Night Over the Rhone.

In mid-September 1889, following a heavy crisis which lasted from mid-July to the last days of August, he thought to include this “Study of the Night” in the next batch of works to be sent to his brother, Theo, in Paris. In order to reduce the shipping costs, he withheld three of the studies (“above-mentioned – Poppies – Night Effect – Moonrise”). These three went to Paris with the shipment to follow. As Theo did not immediately report its arrival, Vincent inquired again, and finally received Theo’s commentary on his recent work.