“Meditation for the Everyman” is a video art project (and meditation) aimed at creating an internal shift in thought and feeling within the participant. With an air of appreciation and positive subconscious messaging, the video gently guides one to feeling good… because feeling good is what it’s all about.

by Warholian’s own Michael Cuffe

Follow Michael on FB here:http://www.Facebook.com/MikeCuffe

WHAT YOU NEED: 
Headphones. Laptop. A room to yourself.

HOW TO WATCH:
The viewer is invited to participate in this meditation by finding a quite place to watch this video alone. 


For full effect, turn the volume up (don’t worry, nothing will jump out) and enter FULLSCREEN in the video player (the four expanding arrows in the lower right corner of the player screen).

For the “HD EXPERIENCE” turn the lights off making the room entirely dark. With the laptop glowing it’s spectacular luminescence, put your headphones ON.
Relax, enjoy, and “breathe” when the video prompts you to. :)

Meditation for the Everyman was written by Michael Cuffe, paired to the song “Don’t Stop” by Phantogram.


Visit Phantogram online at: phantogrammusic.virb.com/

The Christ of St. John of the Cross - by Salvador Dali - 1951. Oil on canvas. 205 x 116 cm. St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art, Glasgow, USA
Christ of Saint John of the Cross is a painting by Salvador Dalí made in 1951. It depicts Jesus Christ on the cross in a darkened sky floating over a body of water complete with a boat and fishermen. Although it is a depiction of the crucifixion, it is devoid of nails, blood, and a crown of thorns, because, according to Dalí, he was convinced by a dream that these features would mar his depiction of Christ. Also in a dream, the importance of depicting Christ in the extreme angle evident in the painting was revealed to him.

The Christ of St. John of the Cross - by Salvador Dali - 1951. Oil on canvas. 205 x 116 cm. St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art, Glasgow, USA

Christ of Saint John of the Cross is a painting by Salvador Dalí made in 1951. It depicts Jesus Christ on the cross in a darkened sky floating over a body of water complete with a boat and fishermen. Although it is a depiction of the crucifixion, it is devoid of nails, blood, and a crown of thorns, because, according to Dalí, he was convinced by a dream that these features would mar his depiction of Christ. Also in a dream, the importance of depicting Christ in the extreme angle evident in the painting was revealed to him.

Music in the Tuileries is a painting by Édouard Manet which hangs in the National Gallery, London

It is an early example of Manet’s painterly style, inspired by Frans Hals and Diego Velázquez, and it is a harbinger of his life-long interest in the subject of leisure.

While the picture was not regarded as finished by some, the suggested atmosphere imparts a sense of what the Tuileries gardens were like at the time; one may imagine the music and conversation.

Here Manet has depicted his friends, artists, authors, and musicians who take part, and he has included a self-portrait among the subjects. Included in the image are Manet himself, Charles Baudelaire, Théophile Gautier, Henri Fantin-Latour, Jacques Offenbach, and Manet’s brother Eugène.


The Scream (Norwegian: Skrik; created in 1893–1910) is the title of expressionist paintings and prints in a series by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch, showing an agonized figure against a blood red sky. The landscape in the background is the Oslofjord, viewed from the hill of Ekeberg, in Oslo (then Kristiania), Norway.
Edvard Munch created several versions of The Scream in various media. The Munch Museum holds one of two painted versions (1910, see gallery) and one pastel. The National Gallery of Norway holds the other painted version (1893, shown to right). A fourth version, in pastel, is owned by Norwegian businessman Petter Olsen. Munch also created a lithograph of the image in 1895.
The Scream has been the target of several high-profile art thefts. In 1994, the version in the National Gallery was stolen. It was recovered several months later. In 2004, The Scream and Madonna were stolen from the Munch Museum. Both paintings were recovered in 2006. They had sustained some damage and went back on display in May 2008, after undergoing restoration.

The Scream (Norwegian: Skrik; created in 1893–1910) is the title of expressionist paintings and prints in a series by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch, showing an agonized figure against a blood red sky. The landscape in the background is the Oslofjord, viewed from the hill of Ekeberg, in Oslo (then Kristiania), Norway.

Edvard Munch created several versions of The Scream in various media. The Munch Museum holds one of two painted versions (1910, see gallery) and one pastel. The National Gallery of Norway holds the other painted version (1893, shown to right). A fourth version, in pastel, is owned by Norwegian businessman Petter Olsen. Munch also created a lithograph of the image in 1895.

The Scream has been the target of several high-profile art thefts. In 1994, the version in the National Gallery was stolen. It was recovered several months later. In 2004, The Scream and Madonna were stolen from the Munch Museum. Both paintings were recovered in 2006. They had sustained some damage and went back on display in May 2008, after undergoing restoration.

The Pietà (1498–1499) is a masterpiece of Renaissance sculpture by Michelangelo Buonarroti, housed in St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City. It is the first of a number of works of the same theme by the artist. The statue was commissioned for the French cardinal Jean de Billheres, who was a representative in Rome. The statue was made for the cardinal’s funeral monument, but was moved to its current location, the first chapel on the right as one enters the basilica, in the 18th century. It is the only piece Michelangelo ever signed (See History after completion).

This famous work of art depicts the body of Jesus on the lap of his mother Mary after the Crucifixion. The theme is of Northern origin, popular by that time in France but not yet in Italy. Michelangelo’s interpretation of the Pietà is unique to the precedents. It is an important work as it balances the Renaissance ideals of classical beauty with naturalism. The statue is one of the most highly finished works by Michelangelo.

Check out our FULL photo set of Ferris Plock and his show “Rest for the Wicked” on our Flickr here:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/warholian/sets/72157624740394858/

Rest for the Wicked

August 14th - September 4th

The Shooting Gallery is pleased to present Rest for the Wicked, a solo exhibition by San Francisco-based artist, Ferris Plock. This new collection embodies the artist’s trademark character-based works along with a Ukiyo-e inspired sensibility. The exhibit is the artist’s debut show with The Shooting Gallery and will be comprised of 15-20 small to medium pieces composed of a variety of media such as acrylic, gouache, gold leaf, and spray paint on wood panel. The opening reception for Rest For The Wicked will be held at The Shooting Gallery on Saturday, August 14th, 2010 from 7-11pm. The exhibit will be on display through September 4th, 2010 and is free and open to the public.

http://www.ShootingGallerySF.com

http://www.FerrisPlock.com