Be sure to check out our story on Voodoo Chop, the latest group show at Project One gallery which is an exploration of the tranquility, ferocity, and mystique of the ocean’s waves. Review and photos by Warholian's own Michael Cuffe.

Be sure to check out our story on Voodoo Chop, the latest group show at Project One gallery which is an exploration of the tranquility, ferocity, and mystique of the ocean’s waves. Review and photos by Warholian's own Michael Cuffe.

Photographer Tim Mckenna is kicking photography up a notch with these arial helicopter tilt shift shots of Teahupo’o surf break in Tahiti.  Amazing stuff.

www.timmckennaphoto.com

The Great Wave off Kanagawa (神奈川沖浪裏, Kanagawa Oki Nami Ura?, lit. “Under a Wave off Kanagawa”), also known as The Great Wave or simply The Wave, is a woodblock print by the Japanese artist Hokusai. An example of ukiyo-e art, it was published sometime between 1830 and 1833[2] (during the Edo Period) as the first in Hokusai’s series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (Fugaku sanjūrokkei (富嶽三十六景?)),  and is his most famous work. This particular woodblock is one of the  most recognized works of Japanese art in the world. It depicts an  enormous wave threatening boats near the Japanese prefecture of Kanagawa. While sometimes assumed to be a tsunami, the wave is, as the picture’s title notes, more likely to be a large okinami lit. “wave of the open sea.” As in all the prints in the series, it depicts the area around Mount Fuji under particular conditions, and the mountain itself appears in the background.
Copies of the print are in many Western collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, the British Museum in London, and in Claude Monet's house in Giverny, France.

The Great Wave off Kanagawa (神奈川沖浪裏, Kanagawa Oki Nami Ura?, lit. “Under a Wave off Kanagawa”), also known as The Great Wave or simply The Wave, is a woodblock print by the Japanese artist Hokusai. An example of ukiyo-e art, it was published sometime between 1830 and 1833[2] (during the Edo Period) as the first in Hokusai’s series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (Fugaku sanjūrokkei (富嶽三十六景?)), and is his most famous work. This particular woodblock is one of the most recognized works of Japanese art in the world. It depicts an enormous wave threatening boats near the Japanese prefecture of Kanagawa. While sometimes assumed to be a tsunami, the wave is, as the picture’s title notes, more likely to be a large okinami lit. “wave of the open sea.” As in all the prints in the series, it depicts the area around Mount Fuji under particular conditions, and the mountain itself appears in the background.

Copies of the print are in many Western collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, the British Museum in London, and in Claude Monet's house in Giverny, France.